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Archive for the ‘J.R.R. Tolkien’ Category

Spanish Tolkien Society announces Ælfwine Awards 2014

Cartel_certamen_ensayo_Aelfwine_2014_-_Sociedad_Tolkien_Espanola_LOW_RES News from our friends at the Spanish Tolkien Society, which has just has announced its 10th edition of the Essay Awards Ælfwine Awards 2014.

The aim of the awards is to promote and encourage the knowledge and study of J.R.R. Tolkien’s life and works. The deadline date for submission of essays is be October 1st, 2014. Follow the link below for more information. (more…)

Posted in Fans, J.R.R. Tolkien, TheOneRing.net Community, Tolkien

TORn cosplay group in FantasyCon parade

Costume-ParadeThere is a lot of very important info. Please take note of the following:

-To join the TORn Cosplay group, simply email me at Garfeimao@TheOneRing.net to RSVP for everyone in your group, and then follow the below instructions on when and where to meet up. You can also stop by our booth #519/521 to sign up on Thursday.

-The parade is on July 4th at 8:30 am.

-Fantasycon goers get free parking at Gateway Center

- We will start staging at 7:30 am. Please arrive as close to 7:30 am as possible. I will be dressed as Bilbo after the spider fight (think cobwebs), so find me to check with me, and then I will check in for the whole group.

- If you are a walking group, you MUST be in the staging area by 8:10 am. *If you are not in the staging area by the allotted time, you will NOT be able to participate in the parade!

- You will only be allowed to drive up/down 50 North until 8:00 am.

The staging will take place in the North-West corner of the parking lot on the corner of 50 North and 500 West.

  • Check-in will be at the staging area. Please send ONE person to check-in as soon as every member of your group has arrived in the staging area. Again, find me in this staging area (look for other denizens of Middle-earth) and then I will check in for the group at 8am sharp. Our group number is 27 and there will be roller skaters behind us.

Every member who participates in the parade will be receiving one (1) free one-day pass for Friday, July 4th. You will receive them at the parade check-in.

**When marching, please keep 2 – 3 car lengths between your group and the group in front of you. Please also be aware that we have many varying groups that will be on roller blades, bicycles, motorcycles, cars, trucks, buses, etc. that many need additional space to do tricks or performances.

Please see the FantasyCon parade webpage for a map of the location.

If you are confused, or need any help the day of the parade, find someone in a FantasyCon volunteer t-shirt. They will be more than happy to provide any needed assistance.

 

The parade line-up is as follows:

 

Police Car

Royd Tolkien

Bagpipes & Drummers

1 – Volunteers w/ Banner & Dragons

2 – FantasyCon Performers

3 – LARPERS

4 – Utah Film Commissioner

5 – Fear Factory

6 – Umbrella Corp.

7 – Mandalorians

8 – Jabba da Hutt

9 – Rouge Base Rebel Legion

10 – Ghostbuster

12 – Castle of Chaos

13 – Midvale Main Street Theatre

14 – NUAD

15 – VIP Limo & Voodoo Productions

16 – Fairy Cosplayers

17 – Loop & Hook

18 – Rose Court Guild

19 – Winter Faire

20 – Atomic Hype

21 – Rocky Mountain Muggles

22 – DrumBus

23 – MASK Costume

24 – Out of Shadows Theater Group & Salty Horror Film Fest/Convention/Productions

26 – Nihon Matsuri

27 – LOTR Cosplay Group

28 – Red Rockettes Roller Derby

29 – United Furry Fandom

30 – Steampunk Cosplay Group

31 – Nightmare on 13th

33 – ****Cosplay Chaos Group All solo cosplayers or small groups

 

****All solo or small group cosplayers, that are not listed above, will be in the “Cosplay Chaos Group”, which will be ending the parade.*** *

 

Posted in Conventions, Creations, Events, Fans, FantasyCon, Hobbit Movie, J.R.R. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, LotR Movies, Meet Ups, Other Events, Other Tolkien books, Silmarillion, The Hobbit, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, TheOneRing.net Community, Tolkien

Nye Green talks about his short film Tolkien’s Road

1965546_430746457061313_8365414039015644152_o Our friends at El Anillo Único have just published an interview with Nye Green, writer and director of Tolkien’s Road.

Tolkien’s Road is a short film about the life of JRR Tolkien.

Tolkien’s Road is a student film project about J.R.R. Tolkien’s journey to beginning his first book The Hobbit. But before he can bring the world of Middle-earth to life he must overcome the trauma of fighting in WWI and find his voice again.

(more…)

Posted in Creations, Fans, J.R.R. Tolkien, Tolkien

Why would Smaug need to cross a bridge to attack Lake-town?

head It’s a topical question as the final film of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit approach: Tolkien emphasises that the bridge over to Lake-town functions as a protection against enemies — and especially the dragon of the Mountain. But why would Smaug need to cross a bridge in order to attack Lake-town? After all, he has wings. (more…)

Posted in Green Books, Hobbit Book, J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit, Tolkien

Call for papers: the fourth TORn Amateur Symposium

TORn Amateur Symposium The folks of the TORn message board Reading Room, the section of our forums devoted to discussion of Tolkien’s literary works, have just put out for a call for papers for the fourth TORn Amateur Symposium (also known as TAS4).

Previous TORn Amateur Symposiums have published essays on topics as varied as The Physics of The Hobbit, The Corrupting Nature of The One Ring, Concepts of Healing in Middle-earth, The Matter of Glorfindel, and Music and Race in Howard Shore’s Score.

For this TAS, the team of Brethil, Elaen32 and DanielLB are looking for papers that all touch upon The Lord of the Rings in some way.

TAS is an opportunity for those who love Middle-earth to share their ideas on Tolkien-related subjects in a longer written form. (more…)

Posted in J.R.R. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, Miscellaneous, Other Tolkien books, Silmarillion, The Hobbit, TheOneRing.net Announcements, TheOneRing.net Community, Tolkien

Tolkien research recovers long-lost magazines of famous WWI poet Wilfred Owen

One of the missing issues of The Hydra, rediscovered in an Oxford attic thanks to my researches. The magazine was produced by officers being treated for war trauma. Wilfred Owen published his first classic war poems in its pages.

One of the missing issues of The Hydra, rediscovered in an Oxford attic thanks to my researches. The magazine was produced by officers being treated for war trauma. Wilfred Owen published his first classic war poems in its pages.

Tolkien scholar John Garth tells us about “an unusual but historically significant tangent” of his Tolkien research that coincidentally led to the recovery of a long-lost series of magazines published by famous WWI poet Wilfred Owen.

Don’t forget to follow the link to read the entire article; it’s definitely worth the time.
  (more…)

Posted in Green Books, J.R.R. Tolkien, Tolkien

New Video detailing ABC’s upcoming reality show “The Quest” released online

TheQuest Official It’s a testament to the genius of Professor Tolkien that each time we open the pages of his books, we feel like we’ve entered the world of Middle-earth. But just imagine for a moment, that you were not just a passive observer of Frodo’s quest – but a true participant and member of the Fellowship of the Ring.

Well, beginning July 31 on ABC, the reality show The Quest will place 12 reality contestants into a very similar scenario. They will be dropped into a scripted fantasy world reminiscent of the stories of Tolkien and George R.R. Martin, as they embark on an epic adventure.

A new video for the series has been released on Mashable.com, for the first time fully explaining what the new show will contain. (more…)

Posted in J.R.R. Tolkien, Miscellaneous, Television

Fantasy authors, media tropes and Tolkien’s great shadow

lord-of-the-rings-vs-game-of-thrones Similarities and differences. Or as Tolkien might have put it, bones and soup. It’s the never-ending, never truly answerable question of who owes whom what.

In this recent article on the BBC, Jane Ciabattari examined how The Lord of the Rings has influenced the creator of A Song of Ice and Fire, George RR Martin.

Fair enough. (more…)

Posted in Fellowship of the Ring, Green Books, J.R.R. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, LotR Books, Return of the King, The Two Towers, Tolkien

TORn Message Boards Weekly Roundup – June 15, 2014

TORn Boards Member DirectoryWelcome to our collection of TORn’s hottest topics for the past week.  If you’ve fallen behind on what’s happening on the Message Boards, here’s a great way to catch the highlights.  Or if you’re new to TORn and want to enjoy some great conversations, just follow the links to some of our most popular discussions.  Watch this space as every weekend we will spotlight the most popular buzz on TORn’s Message Boards.  Everyone is welcome, so come on in and join the fun!

(more…)

Posted in Fans, J.R.R. Tolkien, TheOneRing.net Announcements, TheOneRing.net Community, Tolkien

Tolkien and the virtues of fairy-stories

9780007375288 In our latest Library piece, TORn feature writer Tedoras discusses 10 key excerpts from J.R.R. Tolkien’s famous lecture On Fairy Stories.

In case you’ve never read it, On Fairy Stories (which Tolkien first delivered as a lecture in 1939) examines the fairy-story as a literary form, and explains Tolkien’s philosophy of what fantasy is, and how it ought to work. As Verlyn Flieger and Douglas A. Anderson write in their introduction to the expanded 2008 reprint, On Fairy Stories is “[Tolkien's] most explicit analysis of his own art”.

 


The virtues of fairy-stories

By Tedoras

Professor Tolkien—as he was known then—was a very busy man in 1938. Not only was he beginning to develop what would become The Lord of the Rings, but he also delivered at this time one of his most famous lectures, titled “On Fairy-stories.” (more…)

Posted in Christopher Tolkien, Green Books, J.R.R. Tolkien, Other Tolkien books, Tolkien

Tolkien’s Beowulf – a review

BeowulfAs you know, in May this year J R R Tolkien’s translation of the epic Anglo-Saxon poem Beowulf was finally published. This beautiful volume, edited by Christopher Tolkien, also includes commentary on the poem and the task of translating it (taken from the Professor’s own lectures); J R R Tolkien’s own Old English poem, ‘Sellic Spell’ (in both the Anglo Saxon and modern English); and a poem ‘The Lay of Beowulf’, again written by the Professor.

As someone who studied Old English and Middle English at University, and having read both Beowulf and Tolkien’s translation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, I had long been curious about the Professor’s Beowulf translation. It’s been a long wait for this text to be published – and it doesn’t disappoint!

The first thing one notices about the book is what a lovely edition it is. A black hardback with gold lettering on the spine, the book has a paper jacket, which features three of Tolkien’s own illustrations – including on the front a beautiful green dragon, curled like knotwork and delicately coloured. This image and the lettering on the front and spine, in white and gold, are raised – a nice touch which adds to the luxurious feel of this book.  (If you want to go REALLY luxurious, Harper Collins, Tolkien’s publishers in Europe, have a special slipcase edition.  As I think this is a text to which I will want to refer again and again, I may start saving my pennies for that edition…)

As ever, Christopher Tolkien’s Preface and Notes are helpful and insightful. In the Preface, he addresses the issues of translation: how does one choose the right word to capture all the nuance and implication of a word in another language? There are always multiple options; which one gives the best ‘feel’ of the original? Judging from J R R Tolkien’s lectures, this was something he pondered – and changed his mind about! – over the years, and as such he came back to and edited his translation. Christopher has done his best to put together the ‘final’ version, but as he writes, the text is ‘in one sense complete, but at the same time evidently ‘unfinished”.  The interesting notes provided illuminate any question marks over word choices.

Christopher also points out another of the inherent difficulties in preparing such a volume for publication. In the Preface, he quotes from one of his father’s letters to Rayner Unwin, with regard to the publication of the translation of Sir Gawain:

  • ‘I am finding the selection of notes, and compressing them, and the introduction, difficult. Too much to say, and not sure of my target. The main target is, of course, the general reader of literary bent but with no knowledge of Middle English; but it cannot be doubted that the book will be ready by students, and by academic folk…’

 

This difficulty of target audience, however, turns out not to be an issue for the volume Christopher Tolkien has put together here; it is neatly arranged so as to be easy for the reader to take from it what he or she wishes.  If you are only interested in reading Beowulf in modern English, so be it; if you are curious about Tolkien’s notes, they are there for you; if you want to see how J R R Tolkien crafted a poem in Anglo-Saxon, you can read his ‘Sellic Spell’ in Old English – but it’s there in modern English, too. Thus this volume can appeal to academics and ‘lay’ readers alike.   (My only slight disappointment is that it does not include the AS Beowulf side by side with Tolkien’s translation; but that extra content would perhaps be superfluous, and certainly it would make the volume rather more weighty!)

The translation itself is in prose – but with an extraordinary sense of the rhythm and shape of the Anglo-Saxon verse. As Christopher writes (in the Introduction), ‘…my father, as it seems to me, determined to make a translation as close as he could to the exact meaning in detail of the Old English poem, far closer than could ever be attained by translation into ‘alliterative verse’, but nonetheless with some suggestion of the rhythm of the original.’  To my ear, Tolkien’s version has a strong feeling of the verse shapes; the two phrase pattern of Old English poetry seems very much to inform the structure of his sentences, and there is a beautiful musicality to the shape of the language. This occasionally means that the syntax is a little complicated, and one needs to read the line aloud to work out the exact meaning – but this is no bad thing. Beowulf is a poem which is meant to be spoken aloud – and I think this translation would be wonderful as a bedtime story!

(Tolkien’s detailed, prose translation is a great companion to Seamus Heaney’s verse translation; the two translations together shed much light on the scope, the energy and the feel of the original Anglo-Saxon poem.)

I haven’t yet read all of the other content of this publication.  I’m excited to discover ‘Sellic Spell’: it is referred to on the book’s fly leaf as ‘a story written by Tolkien suggesting what might have been the form and style of an Old English folktale of Beowulf, in which there was no association with the “historical legends” of the northern kingdoms.’   This makes me wonder if it ties in to Tolkien’s desire to create a English mythology; perhaps this is his version of a specifically English (rather than Danish or Norse) telling of the tale of Grendel and his vanquisher.

‘The Lay of Beowulf’ consists of two poems in ballad form, telling the same stories of the monster and the hero. Tolkien himself had noted, of these texts, ‘Intended to be sung’ – and charmingly, Christopher writes that he remembers ‘his singing this ballad to me when I was seven or eight years old.’  What a delight – again, these poems would make excellent bedtime reading!

I have yet to discover fully all the joys of this publication, but so far it is proving to be a magical and enthralling read. You don’t have to be an Anglo-Saxon scholar to enjoy this book (though you won’t be disappointed by it if you are!): if you’re a fan of Tolkien; if you are fascinated by Old English; if you just enjoy a good tale of monsters and battles – you should get your hands on a copy.

[J R R Tolkien Beowulf: A Translation and Commentary is published in the United States by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, and in Europe by Harper CollinsYou can order it from Amazon - click here.]

Posted in Books, Books Publications, Christopher Tolkien, J.R.R. Tolkien, Merchandise, Other Tolkien books, Shop, Tolkien

TORn Message Boards Weekly Roundup – June 8, 2014

Balrog wings or notWelcome to our collection of TORn’s hottest topics for the past week. If you’ve fallen behind on what’s happening on the Message Boards, here’s a great way to catch the highlights. Or if you’re new to TORn and want to enjoy some great conversations, just follow the links to some of our most popular discussions. Watch this space as every weekend we will spotlight the most popular buzz on TORn’s Message Boards. Everyone is welcome, so come on in and join the fun!

(more…)

Posted in Fellowship of the Ring, Headlines, J.R.R. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings, LotR Books, LotR Movies, Movie Fellowship of the Ring, Movie The Two Towers, Other Tolkien books, Silmarillion, TheOneRing.net Community, Tolkien