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Warren Reviews the EE: More SPOILER-Packed Details

December 3, 2004 at 4:34 pm by Tehanu  - 

People wrote in with a few questions for Ringer spy Warren, whose report we posted a few days ago. Warren answered these questions as well as adding more responses to the review from Robert at Bad Taste

One reader asked “Was there any adult content or offensive language in the Easter Eggs or anywhere else in the Extended Edition?”

Warren: “There was no adult conent or offensive language in the Easter Eggs (Elijah does swear at Dominic after Dominic reveals his identity, but I recall that it was bleeped out), or anywhere else in the movie. I have not had the time to watch the film with any of the commentaries, nor the Appendices.”

Second question: “Do we get to find out the fate of the Disfigured Orc General?”

Warren: “YES!!!!!! The extended scenes during the Battle of Pellenor Fields is phenomenal! In addition to simply more of everything, Eowyn and Merry get thrown from their horse. Once on the ground, we see both engaged in fierce battals slaying Orcs left and right. We then cut to Theoden who sees Eowyn fighting…a smile and look of admiration adorns his face. Merry kills Orc after Orc. Then Eowyn fights the Disfigured Orc, and wounds him (in the leg). Right then, Theoden gets caught by the Witch King and Eoweyn runs to help. After she kills the Witch King, has her emotional moment with Theoden who passes away, we see the Disfigured Orc crawling toward to try and finish her off. Eowyn, injured from her fight with the Witch King crawls away and tries to get Theoden’s sword. It doesn’t look like she’ll make it, but Aragorn and Gimli come through and just whack away at the Disfigured Orc, saving Eowyn.

When the Battle is over, we see the scene where Eomer finds Eowyn who is slack due to her injuries, cradles her in his arms and cries over her. Also, Pippin comes out to the battlefield and finds Merry’s cloak with the elven brooch. He frantically searches for Merry. Later, it is dark out and we see Pippin finding Merry, and promising to look after him.

What make this scene more poignant is that earlier, there is an extended scene when Pippin is whisked away by Ganalf toward Minas Tirith. When Merry runs to the top of the lookout tower to watch him leave, Aragorn follows. Merry then explains to Aragorn how he and Pippin were like twins, always together. Merry says that he always got Pippin into trouble, but was always there to get him out. “Who’ll look after him now?” he asks Aragorn. Thus, roles are reversed as it is Pippin who now says he will look after Merry.

Another additional scene I forgot to mention in my last email.

I talked about how Gandalf explained that the White Tree of Gondor signifies hope, that it will one day blossom when the King returns. Well, there is an additional scene where Denethor marches along in a funeral procession carrying Faramir to the tombs where he is to be burned. Denethor’s madnes is more fully realized as he says “there is no hope for men. Better to die sooner than later.” However, as the scene pulls back from the procession, we see the White Tree…with one single blossom on a branch. Hope returns.

From here, I’ll continue as I did in my last email and comment on Robert’s observations.”

Robert: 56 – The Houses of Healing
One of the most eagerly-awaited scenes, because people who hadn’t read the book did not know exactly what had happened to Eowyn. We witness Eomer’s harrowing tears, and his hug to his sister. Then we move to the Houses of Healing. Aragorn nurses her attentively, though we can see how tired he is. Eomer watches them, worried, but then Eowyn opens her eyes. After a fading sequence, we see her in bed: she wakes up and finally sees Faramir standing beside her. It looks like a dream sequence, but it’s actually an amazing, speechless moment. Definitely the best out of all the new scenes.

Warren: Nothing to add. Very emotional and beautiful.

Robert: 60 – Aragorn subdues the Palantir
Aragorn is in the throne room; he opens the Palantir. Though he experiences agonising pain, with fierce determination he manages to show the sword of Elendir. He sees Arwen in the Palantir and throws it away. In doing so, his Elvish brooch unfastens and falls to the ground, shattering into a thousand pieces.

Warren: A little more detail. During the debate between Eomer, Gandalf, Aragorn, etc. about attacking Mordor. Gandalf asks Aragorn how he knows that Sauron will take the bait. Thus, Aragorn goes to the Palantir. He shows himself to Sauron saying “Long have you searched for me and long have I eluded you.” He then shows Sauron the sword of Elendir and we see Sauron in the Palantir getting his hand chopped by that sword. In return, Sauron shows Aragon Arwen lying on what appears to be her death bed. The shock causes Aragorn to drop the Palantir, and in the process, breaking Arwen brooch, as it falls to stone floor. So later, when Aragorn sees Arwen at his coronation, the moment is more powerful.

Robert: 61 – Faramir and Eowyn
Eowyn, looking dejected, says the whole city has fallen into silence. Faramir tells her this darkness will not last long, and he takes her hand in his. She eventually smiles and leans on him. Nice sequence, but it falls within the realm of classic “comforting” scenes.

Warren: Agree.

Robert: 62 – With the Orcs
Sam and Frodo, disguised as Orcs, meet the troops that are making their way there; they crouch down, hoping not to be seen. But they are captured, whipped and taken into the group. We quickly get to see Aragorn’s troops, only to get swiftly back to our heroes. An inspection takes place. Frodo cannot stand on his feet, which causes the commander to notice them both. Frodo and Sam pretend to fight one another and take advantage of the confusion that ensues to flee unnoticed. Frankly, their flee is quite unbeliavable, so I think it was a good idea to not insert this scene in the theatrical version

Warren: Accurately described. This scene explains how Frodo and Sam crossed the plains without being noticed. They didn’t. They were noticed, not recognized, and escaped.

Robert: 64 – The Mouth of Sauron
The Fellowship moves toward the Black Gate, while Frodo is looking more and more drained and exhausted. The gate opens and the Mouth of Sauron comes out to welcome them. Aragorn acts in an arrogant and conceited manner. The Mouth of Sauron asks who, among them, has the authority to negotiate; but Gandalf challenges him saying that Sauron must give up the land. The Mouth of Sauron shows them Frodo’s coat of Mithril mail, telling them that the hobbit has suffered horribly prior to his death. Aragon moves closer and, upon hearing the Mouth’s words, kills him without a second thought, which makes the scene too much ironic (a charismatic character as the Mouth of Sauron doesn‚t deserve to die so abruptly). ‘End of negotiations’, comes Gimli’s ironic comment. Aragorn tries to console everyone, assuring them he does not believe the Mouth’s version of events.

Warren: Here’s a more embellished version. Aragorn, Gandalf, Legolas, Eomer, Gimli, and Merry and Pippin all ride to the Black Gate. It opens and the Mouth of Sauron comes out, riding on an armor covered horse. He is completely covered in garb with a helmet that covers all except for his mouth…which has no lips and bares rotted teeth. He askas who has the authority to treat with him, and Gandalf says there will be no treaty and that Sauron must be exiled. The Mouth of Sauron then says that his master has bidden him to show them this…and he holds out Frodo’s mithril coat. When Pippin and Merry exclaim horror and sorrow, (Gandalf starts to tear) Gandalf tries to shush them, but the Mouth notices and plays on the fact the “halfling was dear to you.” He then describes Frodo’s death as exceedingly painful. As Aragorn then approaches, the Mouth of Sauron comment, “So this is Isildur’s heir. It takes more than a sword to…” which is when Aragorn abruptly chops his head off. ” I don’t believe him!” he shouts. “I won’t!” The Black Gate then opens further and we see the 10,000 orcs heading their way. When Aragorn says a bit later (after his Henry V speech), “For Frodo.” we understand the emotion of the hobbits, Gandalf and the rest a great deal more.

Last extended scene that I recall. There is an extended fight sequence between Gollum, Sam and Frodo on Mount Doom. At one point, Gollum has Frodo by the throat, and Frodo manages to eke out…”But you swore, Smeagol. You swore on the precious.” And in a look that is all Gollum, he replies…”Smeagol lied.” Of course at that point Sam hits him with a rock and the fight ensues.

That’s all I’ve got. Hope it helps.

Posted in Old Special Reports on December 3, 2004 by

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